Tagged: italy

Dinner | Gnocchi in Tomato

Gnocchi in Tomato

When visiting florence, I had the most beautiful Gnocchi. It was in a crab sauce and was like nothing I had tried before. This is my take on Gnocchi, no crab, just a simple tomato sauce, but it is so good!

For the Gnocchi:
3 boiled potatoes, mashed
1/2 cup flour
1 Tbsp olive oil
Salt

For the tomato sauce:
Chilli flakes
3 cloves garlic
3 anchovies
4 tomatoes, pealed
olive oil

For the gnocchi, mix all ingredients together until a dough forms. Roll out into a long strip and cut the strip into small cylinders. Boil in boiling salted water and when gnocchi floats to the top, they are ready.

For sauce, fry garlic and anchovies in olive oil. When garlic is fragrant, add tomatoes and cook for 10 minutes on a medium heat. Then add the gnocchi to the sauce and serve with pangritata and pancetta.

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Dinner | Ricotta Tortelloni in Boscaiola Sauce

Ricotta Tortelloni in Boscaiola Sauce

This is my signature dish (signature because I make it over and over again at work!) It is the easiest dish to make, and if you follow the few simple instructions, your boscaiola sauce will be thick and creamy!

For the Pasta:
1 cup Flour
1 large egg
1 Tbsp Olive Oil

Pasta filling:
1 boiled potato, mashed
1 cup ricotta cheese
1/4 cup parmesan
salt and pepper

Boscaiola Sauce:
1 cup cream
Tbsp parmesan
1/2 cup bacon pieces
1/2 cup sliced mushroom
pepper

Pangritata:
1 cup of fresh bread crumbs
olive oil
thyme

For the pasta, mix all the ingredients until a smooth ball forms. Need the dough for ten minutes until soft.
Laminate the dough ten times in a pasta machine and then continue to roll the dough until you reach the smallest setting. Cut the dough into round pieces and cover with a tea towel.

Mix the pasta filling together and place small amounts in the centre of the circular pieces of dough. Fold the dough to form a semi-circle and seal the edges together with water. Fold again to form the Tortelloni shape.

For the Boscaiola sauce, on a high heat fry bacon pieces in a little oil until crispy. Add the mushroom and continue frying until the mushroom pieces are also crispy. Turn the stove to low and add cream, parmesan and pepper and let the sauce bubble away for approx. eight minutes. Do not stir! After the eight minutes the sauce should be dark and thick. Boil the pasta for one minute and then add to the sauce.

For the Pangritata, add ingredients into a hot pan and fry until all the bread crumbs are golden and toasted. Pour over pasta. Add some crispy pancetta pieces and serve.

Review | Via Napoli

Via Napoli

Where in the world can you get two metres of top-quality, only authentic, wood-fried pizza? In Sydney’s Lane Cove. The pizza chef’s cheered as metres upon metres of pizza came out of the mouth of the hot oven and was carried above people’s heads by a squadron of about five men. It was almost a military operation! But what was even more amazing was that the ingredients were so authentic that the broccoli-like vegetable on the pizza, Friarielli, was grown in the volcanic soil of Mount Vesuvius and flown over to Australia to be used as a pizza topping. And why grown in volcanic soil I hear you ask? Well the rich soil gives the Friarielli a creamy, but bitter flavour – something quite unique.

Lunch | Buffalo Mozzarella

Buffalo Mozzarella

Who would have thought that a place in Lane Cove would serve Buffalo Mozzarella made in Naples and flown to Australia within the week it was made!! Sometimes I am convinced that in order to experience true Italian food, I have to be in Italy – but apparently not! Via Napoli has to be one of the most authentic Italian places in sydney! As soon as that ball of cheese was sliced down the middle, buffalo milk rushed out and my eyes seemed to pull themselves away from the direction of the provincial wood fired ovens and straight onto the soft, velvety cheese. I felt the same rush of energy that I had felt in Italy, an energy that forced an enthusiasm for the dishes that were to come.

Travel | Pizza’s on the Venetian Lagoon

Pizza's on the Venetian Lagoon

Weirdly, the only pizza I ate on my trip to Italy was in Venice. Dad and I found a restaurant that overlooked the water, and bravely chose to sit outside and soak in the sun, although it was fleeting. The pizza was so simple, yet so good! Crispy, elastic bread covered with shaved prosciutto and mozzarella cheese. It’s these little food experiences, that although not to fancy and not over-exciting, that capture the true essence of the city.

Travel | Venetian Fisherman’s Basket

Venetian Fisherman's Basket

What could be better than a mix of all the day’s catch, lightly battered and crispy fried? The catch being from Venice of course! Waiting for our train to arrive, dad and I popped into the first restaurant we could find. Browsing over at other tables to see what they were eating, I saw the fisherman’s basket and I immediately knew that that was what I wanted! And let me tell you, quality-wise, flavour-wise; the dish delivered!

Travel | Pork Fest!

Pork Fest!

My first experience of Italy was everything I had imagined it to be! Vibrant people flooded the narrow alleyways, occasionally deviating into small delicatessens. It was almost as if Italian grocers only sold prosciutto and parmesan cheese. But It was to my excitement that I experienced the most sublime array of delicatessens the world has to offer – Bologna, being home to some of the best! Enormous cured pig legs rimmed the ceiling of the store, followed by a lower rim of dried Italian sausage. The counters were packed with piles of age old parmesan quarters and below the sectioned off cooler was home to some of the most delicate nona-style tortellini, tortolloni and Ravioli. It was as if every Delicatessen in every alley way was having a full-blown pork-fest. Heaven!